Problem-Based Learning in Higher Education: Untold Stories

By Maggi Savin-Baden | Go to book overview

Glossary

Complexity skills: the advanced skills that go beyond key skills and subject skills in a qualification framework, such as the capacity to work in complex and ambiguous contexts and to solve and manage problems in ways that transcend conventional lines of thinking.

Critical choice: the opportunity for students to examine their learner stances and to explore the pedagogic influences on the development of their learner identity.

Critical contestability: a position whereby students understand and acknowledge the transient nature of subject and discipline boundaries. They are able to transcend and interrogate these boundaries through a commitment to exploring the subtext of subjects and disciplines.

Dialogic learning: learning that occurs when insights and understandings emerge through dialogue in a learning environment. It is a form of learning where students draw on their own experience to explain the concepts and ideas with which they are presented, and then use that experience to make sense for themselves and also to explore further issues.

Disjunction: a sense of fragmentation of part of, or all of, the self, characterized by frustration and confusion and a loss of sense of self, which often results in anger and the need for right answers.

Domain: the overlapping spheres within each stance. The borders of the domains merge with one another and therefore shifts between domains are transitional areas where particular kinds of learning occur.

Interactional stance: the ways in which learners work and learn in groups and construct meaning in relation to one another.

Interprofessional education: the use of a variety of teaching methods and learning strategies to encourage interaction and interactive learning across the professions, which includes the development of skills and attitudes as well as knowledge.

Key skills: skills such as working with others, problem-solving and improving personal learning and performance that it is expected students will require for the world of work.

Learner identity: an identity formulated through the interaction of learner and learning. The notion of learner identity moves beyond, but encapsulates the notion of learning style, and encompasses positions that students take up in learning situations, whether consciously or unconsciously.

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