Educational Research for Social Justice: Getting off the Fence

By Morwenna Griffiths | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I owe more than I can say to a large number of people who have contributed directly and indirectly to my writing this book. I want to acknowledge and thank at least some of them. Of course, none of them is responsible for the final form. The mistakes are all my own.

The Nottingham Group for Social Justice gave of their time, energy and thoughtful good sense - and, anyway, I enjoyed all our meetings enormously. Thank you to Beryl Bennett, Max Biddulph, Carol Davies, Carolyn Goddard, June Hunter, David Martin, Syble Morgan, Prakash Ross, Jacky Smith, Nada Trikic and Sue Wallace. I am also grateful to Gwen Schaffer, who began with the group, but was unable to continue. Other people were helpful in that project, especially Mary Biddulph, Suzan Gokova and Kaye Haw, all of whom helped me to iron out issues of interviewing. Anne Seller and Judy Hughes helped at the first stages of formulation, in the course of a glorious week in the west of Scotland. Anne and I went on talking about the nature of a private or public space in an astonishing variety of settings, from the tea room at the National Gallery to the Peak District in early January. I learnt a lot too from my fellow organizers of symposia related to social justice at the British and European Educational Research Conferences in 1996: Rob McBride, Tony Sewell and Gaby Weiner. (Seville in late September was a particularly pleasant place in which to learn.) In the final stages, much later, very many thanks are due to Jacky Brine, John Coldron, Kaye Haw, Mary Hayes and Peter Bowbrick, who all managed to read it, thoughtfully, critically and most of all quickly, at a time when they were all extremely busy and hard pressed with other things. It all took rather longer than I had expected, and I was very grateful to my colleagues in the Faculty of Education at Nottingham Trent University, and to Pat Sikes, series editor, and Shona Mullen at Open University Press, for their understanding, advice, support and help.

-xii-

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Educational Research for Social Justice: Getting off the Fence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Doing Qualitative Research in Educational Settings ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editor's Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Part I: Introduction and Context 1
  • 1: Taking Sides, Getting Change 3
  • 2: Research for Social Justice? Some Examples 15
  • Part II: Theoretical Frameworks for Practical Purposes 29
  • Introduction to Part II 31
  • 3: Truths and Methods 33
  • 4: Facts and Values 44
  • 5: Living with Uncertainty in Educational Research 65
  • 6: Educational Research for Social Justice 85
  • Part III: Practical Possibilities 99
  • Introduction to Part III 101
  • 7: Getting Started 105
  • 8: Getting Justice 117
  • 9: Better Knowledge 129
  • 10: Educational Research at Large 141
  • Appendix: Fair Schools 148
  • References 149
  • Index 159
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