Educational Research for Social Justice: Getting off the Fence

By Morwenna Griffiths | Go to book overview

Introduction to Part II

This chapter marks the beginning of Part II of this book. Readers may want to continue here, reading this Part before they read Part III. But they should pause before they do so. Everything depends on the reader's needs and interests, and they need to consider these before deciding in what order to read the book. It is in the order it is for reasons of logic, not because this is necessarily the best way to read it. I wanted to explain how I arrived at the principles on which the discussions in Part III are based, before I discussed their use. However, readers might well want to take the principles as given and go straight to Part III.

As I said in Chapter 1, it is my view that the theoretical abstractions and the practical realities of research are so interrelated that each has to be understood alongside and in connection with the other (rather than either being prior to the other). It is for this reason that I have written this book to be read in an order that suits individual readers, knowing that they may well want to dip in and out of different chapters.

There could be several reasons for readers wanting to begin with Part II. Perhaps they have done quite a lot of research already and are looking for theoretical underpinnings to practical choices they have made. Or they are looking for challenges to the ideas they have developed already. Or perhaps they came to research precisely because they find abstract theory mindstretching and intellectually satisfying. Perhaps they have reached that stage in an accredited research degree when they have to grapple with questions of methodology and epistemology, and they find that there is very little that directly addresses general questions related to social justice in educational research.

The language of Part II is suited to dense and difficult theorizing. I say something about so-called 'jargon' and its uses in Chapter 3. But before reading any of the chapters, readers need to be aware that these chapters are heavy, dense and difficult and they are like this because the issues they raise are themselves complex and the subject of much unavoidable debate, both

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Educational Research for Social Justice: Getting off the Fence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Doing Qualitative Research in Educational Settings ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editor's Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Part I: Introduction and Context 1
  • 1: Taking Sides, Getting Change 3
  • 2: Research for Social Justice? Some Examples 15
  • Part II: Theoretical Frameworks for Practical Purposes 29
  • Introduction to Part II 31
  • 3: Truths and Methods 33
  • 4: Facts and Values 44
  • 5: Living with Uncertainty in Educational Research 65
  • 6: Educational Research for Social Justice 85
  • Part III: Practical Possibilities 99
  • Introduction to Part III 101
  • 7: Getting Started 105
  • 8: Getting Justice 117
  • 9: Better Knowledge 129
  • 10: Educational Research at Large 141
  • Appendix: Fair Schools 148
  • References 149
  • Index 159
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