Effective Teaching and Learning: Teachers' and Students' Perspectives

By Paul Cooper; Donald McIntyre | Go to book overview

2
Gaining access to
teachers' and pupils
thinking: problems,
principles and processes
In Ulis chapter we offer an account of our research methods, and discuss some of the distinctive issues that it was necessary for us to address in putting our research plan into practice. The particular issues that concerned us are by no means unique to our study, but are likely to be encountered by other researchers seeking similar kinds of data. We therefore hope that this chapter will serve a dual purpose by providing:
1. An account of the particular methods which were used in our study, thus offering the reader an opportunity to evaluate the basis for the claims we make about our data.
2. A discussion of methodological issues of general interest to readers wishing to carry out similar studies.

Building on antecedents of the current project

As has been shown in the previous chapter, the current study grew out of research carried out by Brown and Mclntyre (1993). The first task of this chapter, therefore, is to show how research principles and procedures employed by Brown and Mclntyre were utilized in the present study. It will then be shown that certain methodological adaptations and developments were required in an effort to achieve the distinctive objectives of the current study.

Brown and Mclntyre's study set out to investigate successful classroom teaching, and the measures taken by teachers to achieve such success. The study was founded on the principle that

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