Pink Therapy: A Guide for Counsellors and Therapists Working with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

By Dominic Davies; Charles Neal | Go to book overview

BERNARD LYNCH


13
Religious and spirituality
conflicts

Psychotherapy and spirituality are closely related. When we recognize the origins of the term 'healing the soul' (or psyche), we can construct an authentic psychotherapeutic approach. In my quest for understanding the sources of people's pain and its cures, I must affirm on the most profound level that wholeness, holiness and fullness of life can come to the individual through an understanding of God in their life. This approach I call psychospiritual growth.

This chapter offers a non-technical sketch of a theology of healing and personal integration, or psychospirituality, which is applied practically in working with those in conflict with their religion or their spiritual development. I will contend that the impact of organized Christian religions on the psychological and spiritual well-being of lesbians, gay men and bisexual men and women has been negative at best and frequently extremely destructive. It will be helpful to begin with a shared understanding of some key terms. It is important to distinguish between religious and spiritual experience.

Spiritual experience transcends our everyday experience of ourselves in the world. It offers insight into, or connection with, the existence of something more profound. These occurrences cannot be explained easily because our language is rooted in everyday life, but an important part of working psychospiritually involves therapist and client constructing together language, symbols and metaphors with which to communicate their meaning. Spiritual experience is engagement with God in ourselves. Organized religions have, in a sense, interrupted the direct relationship between ourselves and God in ourselves and attempted to own or control that spiritual link. Over history, mainstream religions such as Christianity and Islam have taken over spiritual experience and applied their own

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pink Therapy: A Guide for Counsellors and Therapists Working with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Notes on Contributors vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Fundamental Issues 9
  • 1: An Historical Overview of Homosexuality and Therapy 11
  • 2: Towards a Model of Gay Affirmative Therapy 24
  • 3: Homophobia and Heterosexism 41
  • 4: Working with People Coming Out 66
  • Part II - Working with Particular Issues 87
  • 5: Working with Single People 89
  • 6: Working with People in Relationships 101
  • 7: Lesbian and Gay Parenting Issues 116
  • 8: Working with Young People 131
  • 9: Working with Older Lesbians 149
  • 10: Working with Older Gay Men 159
  • 11: Alcohol and Substance Misuse 170
  • 12: Partner Abuse 188
  • 13: Religious and Spirituality Conflicts 199
  • Appendix I - Resources 209
  • Appendix 2 - Community Resources 213
  • Appendix 3 - Books for Clients and Counsellors 217
  • References 222
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.