Victims as Offenders: The Paradox of Women's Violence in Relationships

By Susan L. Miller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A book of this scope incurs a lot of gratitude, both personal and professional. The seeds of this project began to grow in 1994, when I was invited by Claire M. Renzetti to write a summary piece for a special issue of Violence and Victims. In the journal, Kevin Hamberger and Theresa Potente's article about the implications of treatment for women arrested for domestic violence—most of who acted defensively, not aggressively—aroused my interest. Although I was well versed both as an activist and as a scholar in the area of domestic violence, their topic was new to me—intriguing, a bit daunting, and perplexing. Since that time, I began my own examination into the phenomenon and have grown more aware of the complexities associated with the consequences of domestic violence arrest policies. This book reflects what I have learned.

Claire remains a true friend and colleague to this day. To all who know her through her editorship of the outstanding journal Violence Against Women and other work, she is a breath of fresh air, an inspiring scholar, and simply a wonderful person. I am proud to know her. Carol Post, of the Delaware Coalition of Domestic Violence, and Sue Osthoff, of the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women in Philadelphia—hats off in admiration to both of you for all of your efforts to rid society of violence against women. Special thanks to Carol for her support and professionalism regarding various research endeavors.

I am fortunate to be a member of a terrific intellectual community, and grateful to the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice and also the Women's Studies Program at the University of Delaware for providing an environment conducive to scholarly work and debate. Some of the research was funded by a University of Delaware General University Research grant. Nancy Quillen cheerfully provided crucial secretarial support. In addition, my editor, Kristi Long at Rutgers University Press, continuously encouraged me as I navigated the challenge of new motherhood while writing a book. Special thanks also to Raymond Michalowski, Meda Chesney-Lind, and Marilyn

-xiii-

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