Reinventing the South: Versions of a Literary Region

By Mark Royden Winchell | Go to book overview

11
The Achievement of William Humphrey

At the climactic point of his autobiographical narrative Farther Off from Heaven, William Humphrey comes back to his hometown of Clarksville, Texas, after many years' absence. Struck by the transformation he sees, Humphrey remarks:

In a move that reverses Texas history, a move totally opposite to
what I knew in my childhood, one which all but turns the world
upside down, which makes the sun set in the East, Red River
County has ceased to be Old South and become Far West. I who
for years had had to set my Northern friends straight by pointing
out that I was a Southerner not a Westerner, and that I had never
seen a cowboy or for that matter a beefcow any more than they
had, found myself in the Texas of legend and the popular image
which when I was a child had seemed more romantic to me than
to a boy of New England precisely because it was closer to me
than to him and yet still worlds away. Gone from the square
were the bib overalls of my childhood when the farmers came to
town on Saturday. Ranchers now, they came in high-heeled
boots and rolled-brim hats, a costume that would have pro-
voked as much surprise, and even more derision, there, in my
time, as it would on Manhattan's Madison Avenue.1

What is significant here is not just the town's transformation but the sense of wonder it evokes in Humphrey. His narrative depictions of East Texas—whether southern, western, or a little bit of both—are invariably refracted through the prism of memory. Young

1. Humphrey, Farther Off from Heaven (1977; reprint, New York: Laurel, 1984),
239–40.

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reinventing the South: Versions of a Literary Region
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part One - The Nashville Renascence 1
  • 1: This Land is Your Land 3
  • 2: Arkansas Traveler 10
  • 3: Renaissance Man 22
  • 4: The Legacy of Monroe K. Spears 42
  • 5: Incarnate Words 76
  • 6: [What They Have to Say About Us] 104
  • Part Two - The Lower South 125
  • 7: The Faulkner Wars 127
  • 8: Family Values in Go Down, Moses 139
  • 9: Why Streetcar Keeps Running 161
  • 10: Come Back to the Locker Room Ag'In, Brick Honey! 176
  • 11: The Achievement of William Humphrey 189
  • 12: Scum of the Earth 223
  • Index 243
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.