Life, Death, and Subjectivity: Moral Sources in Bioethics

By Stan Van Hooft | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Stan van Hooft is an Associate Professor of Philosophy on the Melbourne campus of Deakin University in Australia. He gained his Masters and Doctoral degrees from the University of Melbourne in the seventies and taught philosophy in a number of colleges before joining Deakin University. It was while contributing to the design of a new nursing curriculum in Victoria College in the eighties that he developed an interest in philosophical issues relating to health care. He is a member of the Australasian Bioethics Association and of the Australasian Association for Professional and Applied Ethics. He is the author of Caring: An Essay in the Philosophy of Ethics (Niwot: University Press of Colorado, 1995) and numerous journal articles on moral philosophy, bioethics, business ethics, and on the nature of health and disease. He is also a co-author of Facts and Values: An Introduction to Critical Thinking for Nurses (Sydney: MacLennan & Petty, 1995). He conducts Socratic Dialogues for doctors, nurses and a variety of other groups and has organized a monthly Philosophy Café in Melbourne. When not doing philosophy, Stan plays bass guitar in a jam band.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life, Death, and Subjectivity: Moral Sources in Bioethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • One - Subjectivity 19
  • Two - The Moral Significance of Persons 39
  • Three - Reconciling Caring and Justice 59
  • Four - Respect for Life 83
  • Five - Life as a Moral Source 101
  • Six - Living Subjectivity 121
  • Seven - What is Death? 143
  • Eight - Accepting Death 173
  • Notes 201
  • Bibliography 213
  • About the Author 225
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.