Writing British Infanticide: Child-Murder, Gender, and Print, 1722-1859

By Jennifer Thorn | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

FIRST AND FOREMOST, I HEARTILY THANK THE CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS volume, from whom I have learned much. This book would, of course, not exist without their scholarly ardor and rigor. Acknowledging important, if less directly constitutive, enabling of this volume, I thank Susan Greenfield, an organizer of the October 1994 meeting of the northeast division of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), for accepting the panel I proposed on "Infanticide and Social Order" and for encouraging me then to think hard about eighteenth-century intersections of women's reproductive and productive capabilities. This book had its inception in that panel. For valued intellectual stimulation in thinking about the intersection of the historicity of print and infanticide, real and imagined, I thank also the panelists and attendees there and at the infanticide-related panels on infanticide in which I was later involved at meetings of ASECS, of the Group for Early Modern Culture Studies, and at the Folger Library, especially Jo McDonagh, Deidre Day Macleod, Amy Masciola, and Kirsten Saxton. A query posted on-line to the Eighteenth-Century Interdisciplinary Discussion Group yielded especially helpful replies from Christopher Lamping, David Levy, and Kathryn Temple. I thank also members of my summer 2000 writing group, Teresa Berger, Mary McClintock Fulkerson, Leela Prasad, Kathy Rudy, and Tomiko Yoda, for their comments on an earlier version of the introduction. Jinan Joudeh provided vital help with the final checking of the bibliography. Last but by no means least, I thank my graduate research assistant Mary Grace Immediata, whose mighty help with the final stages of the preparation of the manuscript was invaluable. I look forward to seeing her eye for detail, luminous intelligence, and powers of engagement soon bear fruit in her own research projects.

" 'I would be a Witness against my self ': Infanticide and Communion in Colonial New England" is reprinted by permission from Coming into Communion: Pastoral Dialogues in Colonial New England by

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