Mechanically Inclined: Building Grammar, Usage, and Style into Writer's Workshop

By Jeff Anderson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

First, I thank Joyce Armstrong Carroll and Eddie Wilson for hooking me on a life-long study of writing through books, articles, staff development, and classroom practice. They gave me a way into teaching meaningful grammar with their [Four Ways to Use a Comma] in Acts of Teaching, which influenced me heavily in my search for a way into grammar that actually showed up in my students' writing. I went forth and permutated. Joyce and Eddie also taught me to acknowledge those whose shoulders I am standing on, so I will.

This book was inspired by the work of Harry Noden and his book Image Grammar. Harry's brilliant brushstrokes changed the teaching of grammar forever for me and countless others. He has been generous and supportive as I worked on this project, and I count him as a friend. He and Constance Weaver also sent me back to study the late Francis Christensen and his Notes Toward a New Rhetoric.

And it is Constance Weaver's seminal work Teaching Grammar in Context, which I read almost ten years ago, that largely informed my thinking about error and teaching grammar.

To William Strong, whose thought-provoking work and encouraging words helped me believe that I have something to offer to teachers—what a generous man.

Don Murray says we should leave a writing conference wanting to write more. Fortunately, this is always the case with my editor Brenda Power. Her nurturing, driving force ensured my success. Thanks to Bill Varner, who also contributed his grammarian eye to this project. The beautiful design of Martha Drury pulled it all together. Thanks to all the other people at Stenhouse, such as Jay Kilburn, Mary Ann Donahue, and Doug Kolmar.

Thanks to Barry Lane and Jeff Wilhelm for telling me what a gem Brenda is. Jeff's generous advice on how to write a first draft helped me finish the book.

-xv-

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