Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners

By Karen S. Meador | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners is part of the Gifted Treasury Series edited by Jerry D. Flack. The books in this series provide meaningful information, teaching strategies, and abundant resources for anyone interested in the development of children's potential.

This volume examines creative thinking in students from kindergarten to fourth grade, by providing authentic examples from contemporary classrooms, homes, and libraries. Lessons and other suggestions in the book are based on excellent children's literature selections depicting characters who use creative thinking. Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners differs from other books containing suggestions for developing creative thinking because the literary characters become models for students.

The purpose of the book is two-fold because it provides lessons adults can use with little preparation and valuable background information that leads toward the depth of understanding needed to develop creative thinking. It is appropriate for teachers, librarians, and also parents, who may want to modify the lessons for use at home.

The development of creative thinking at home and in educational settings is no longer a choice; it is a mandate for survival. This book illustrates how adults may work toward the goal of improving the creative thinking of every child. It answers all of the following questions:

How can children's books be used to facilitate growth in creative thinking?

What are some strategies for writing meaningful activities that facilitate
creative thinking?

What are some lessons that allow students to think in new and different
ways?

Can not-so-creative teachers facilitate the development of creative thinking
skills in children?

What are some quick and easy activities to use with students?

Why is creative thinking important to young children and how can we
defend it as good classroom practice? (This is especially relevant to
those times when someone walks by the classroom and questions the
[fun] going on.)

-xiii-

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Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Gifted Treasury Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Fluency 1
  • Chapter 2 - Flexibility 20
  • Chapter 3 - Originality 38
  • Chpater 4 - Elaboration 54
  • Chapter 5 - Problem Solving 69
  • Chapter 6 - Characteristics of Creative People 92
  • Chapter 7 - Synergy 112
  • Chapter 8 - Let's Talk 126
  • Afterword 139
  • References 141
  • Author/Title Index 147
  • Subject Index 151
  • About the Author 157
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