Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners

By Karen S. Meador | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Many children have contributed to this book by teaching the author about learning. They have indicated better ways to approach creative endeavors through their personal involvement in my teaching episodes, demonstrated how to have fun while learning, and certified the value of freely exploring ideas. I am especially indebted to the students at Johnson Elementary School in Southlake, Texas; the kindergarten students in Garland, Texas; and the highly creative students attending the Louisiana Creative Scholars Program.

University undergraduate and graduate students have helped me formulate many ideas found in this book through helpful dialogue and questioning. Their classroom conversations with me have led to many creative [ahas.]

I am also indebted to members of the Creativity Division of the National Association for Gifted Students, who have taught me the joy of thinking and acting creatively. There are far too many of these friends to name.

The original artwork by artist Christopher M. Herren gives life to the book. I greatly appreciate the time he siphoned from his painting to originate and create the whimsical fish that so clearly illustrate the creative components. He successfully turned my verbal concepts into visuals.

My family, Don, Brad, and Kim, continue to encourage my writing, and I am thankful to them for their understanding and encouragement. I appreciate their many phone calls to ask how the book was coming, and their positive attitudes regarding my ability to complete this volume.

-xv-

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Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Gifted Treasury Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Fluency 1
  • Chapter 2 - Flexibility 20
  • Chapter 3 - Originality 38
  • Chpater 4 - Elaboration 54
  • Chapter 5 - Problem Solving 69
  • Chapter 6 - Characteristics of Creative People 92
  • Chapter 7 - Synergy 112
  • Chapter 8 - Let's Talk 126
  • Afterword 139
  • References 141
  • Author/Title Index 147
  • Subject Index 151
  • About the Author 157
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