Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners

By Karen S. Meador | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
LET'S TALK

Teachers and Parents

Teachers and parents have many things in common and both hope that children will become healthy, happy, productive members of society. No matter who is responsible for the children, the youngsters arrive with basically the same needs; therefore, this chapter makes little distinction between how parents or teachers nurture children.

Although articles and book chapters, such as this one, often begin with descriptions that help adults determine whether children are creative, this is not important here. While it is not essential to identify creativity, it is essential to nurture it; therefore, assume that the child or children have the potential for creativity.

Very young children are naturally creative as demonstrated through their insatiable curiosity and drive. Follow a two- or three-year-old around for a day, and this will be clear. Typically, little children look at, smell, touch, and sometimes taste things, like a flower in the yard or other objects, learning all they can from the experience. They look in ditches, use rocks to dig in the dirt, talk to inanimate objects, and experiment with all sorts of things. These children unknowingly take risks, tolerate ambiguities, and make original analogies, such as calling a newspaper tossed through the air an airplane. The natural process

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Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Young Learners
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Gifted Treasury Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Fluency 1
  • Chapter 2 - Flexibility 20
  • Chapter 3 - Originality 38
  • Chpater 4 - Elaboration 54
  • Chapter 5 - Problem Solving 69
  • Chapter 6 - Characteristics of Creative People 92
  • Chapter 7 - Synergy 112
  • Chapter 8 - Let's Talk 126
  • Afterword 139
  • References 141
  • Author/Title Index 147
  • Subject Index 151
  • About the Author 157
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