Feminism and Christian Tradition: An Annotated Bibliography and Critical Introduction to the Literature

By Mary-Paula Walsh | Go to book overview

16
Womanism and Womanist
Theology—
The Background Literature

A. Bibliographies and Preliminary Reference Materials

"590" Baer, Hans A. "Bibliography of Social Science Literature on Afro-American Religion in the United States." Review of Religious Research 29 (1988): 413-430. This bibliography is "aimed primarily at social scientists who are interested in various dimensions of Black religion during the twentieth century" (p. 413). The literature is current through 1985 and covers six categories: (1) "Overviews of Black Religion," (2) "Studies of Black Churches in Specific Locales (Rural and Urban)," (3) "Community Studies with Extensive Discussions of Black Religion," (4) "Studies of Black Churches in Specific Locales (Rural and Urban)," (5) "Dimensions of Black Religiosity; White Churches, Racism and Black Americans," and (6) "The Occult Among Black Americans: Voodoo, Hoodoo, and Magic." Section 5 is the most comprehensive with 172 entries and Section 4 the least, with four entries. In all, Baer lists 336 items with numerous sectional subdivisions to guide the user. Missing, however, is research on women in Black religion.

"591" Cone, James H., and Gayraud S. Wilmore, eds. Black Theology: A Documentary History: Volume Two: 1980-1992. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1993.

With its emphases on: (a) the "second generation" of African American theologians and their literature; (b) the necessity and work of a clear dialogue between black theological reflection and black congregational life; (c) the developing literature in African American hermeneutics and biblical studies; (d) womanist theology; and (e) the "global context" of African American theology, this second anthology in the Black Theology Documentary History series is distinctively and selfconsciously different from the first. In the first volume, attention was directed to the history and prophetic development of African American theology, and particularly its roots in the black power movement and the social conditions of African Americans. Here, while empowerment concerns still ground African American theological reflection, attention is more directed to the questions of how African American theology fits against other perspectives, and especially those of the theologizing task itself. Hence, Volume II presents 33 essays reflecting the positions of Black theologians in the above five areas. Editorial introductions well preview each section, notes follow all entries and a 53 item annotated bibliography and comprehensive subject index close the volume. Last, and of special note, is Cone's characaterization of womanist theology as "the most creative development to emerge out of the Black theology movement during the 1980s and 1990s" (p. 257).

"592" Dudley, William, and Charles Cozic, eds. Racism in America: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press, 1991.

This text is a volume within the Opposing Viewpoint Series, a resource for teaching undergraduate sociology; as such, it presents essays of contrasting perspectives on a number of questions relevant to any given topic, here that of racism. While not generated from within a consciously feminist perspective, its questions and bibliography are useful to both womanist and feminist theologians. With an average of 6-7 articles per question the text compactly addresses such questions as: "How serious is the problem of racism in America?" "Is racism responsible for minority poverty?" "Does affirmative action alleviate discrimination?" "Should minorities emphasize their ethnicity?" and

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