Feminism and Christian Tradition: An Annotated Bibliography and Critical Introduction to the Literature

By Mary-Paula Walsh | Go to book overview

VI
Responses and Recent
Developments

Responses to social movements vary, and given the breadth of the women's movement in religion, it is not surprising that responses to feminist and womanist theologies have included both reaction and rejection, adaptation and specific applications, and in academia and the churches, a variety of dialogues which cut deeply across the traditional lines of Asian, Jewish, and Christian faith traditions. This final section of the bibliography presents literature evidencing this range of responses. It is divided into four chapters.

Chapter 21 presents the reactionary responses to feminist theology. It presents literature on "Antifeminism" in church and society, with sociological citations indicating examples of recent research on American antifeminism, and other citations evidencing examples of antifeminist "rhetoric" in both biblical and theological literature, and--one regrets to say--at least some sociological sources. The reactionary tone of these various sources is intense. It is frequently grounded in a fundamentalist reading of not only the Bible, but historical doctrines as well, and it typically has little regard for either the symbolic or the anthropomorphic character of religious language. Indeed, there is an intense hostility within the theological antifeminist literature--and particularly as it addresses feminist trinitarian theology, for in some sources (e.g., Oddie "842"), the distinction between issues and individuals is virtually irrelevant--a circumstance sociologists recognize as a precondition for bigoted and totalitarian perspectives. (Cf. the discussion in James M. Henslin, Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach, 3d ed., Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1997, pp. 421-423.) The literature in Chapter 21 is serious and cannot be ignored, for at root, it is a literature deeply opposed to the flourishing of women in both church and society.

By way of contrast, the literatures in Chapters 22 and 23 are more positive. Chapter 22 presents literature condemning both violence to women and sexual harassment within Christian churches, and Chapter 23 provides literature on the global reach of the feminist theological movement, with particular attention to the international efforts of feminist, Mujerista and womanist theologians on behalf of justice issues for women. These literatures are newly developing and quite strong, although as the notes internal to the Chapter 22 indicate, this particular literature is not without its problems. In particular, the literature on domestic and ecclesial violence frequently lacks definitional clarity and is subsequently open to ideological distortion, and with this, co-optation by reactionary and New Right agendas. These points are detailed in notes internal to the chapter.

Chapter 24 closes the bibliography. It surveys the developing dialogue between Jewish and Christian feminist theological perspectives, and particularly that portion of the dialogue addressing anti-Judaism in Christian feminist theology. This dialogue is one of the most important theological literatures currently in process (for both feminist and androcentric perspectives), for it raises anew the questions of androcentric ecumenism in the study of First and Second Testament writings, and these, as theologians of good will struggle to respond to feminism within their own historical settings and milieux.

A final note: Sources relevant to this section occur variously throughout the bibliography, but of particular relevance to Chapter 21 are the materials in Chapter 12 on feminist ethics, while entries from Chapter 1 addressing global violence to women (viz., Morgan "9", Neft and Levine "10", Schmittroth "11", The United Nations Report "12", French "24" and Heise "28") are especially

-363-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism and Christian Tradition: An Annotated Bibliography and Critical Introduction to the Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 458

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.