Ferdinand Marcos and the Philippines: The Political Economy of Authoritarianism

By Albert F. Celoza | Go to book overview

Chapter 5

The Authoritarian Regime's Network
of Support

Repressive regimes are undesirable, but if they enjoy the support of significant
sectors of society, they are able to maintain themselves in power.

Marcos's expansion of bureaucratic power enabled him to establish the government as the key player in all aspects of Philippine life. He became the power broker, regulating the competing claims of the various powerful elites in Philippine society. Ultimately, Marcos's power rested in satisfying the rent-seeking demands of those elites; therefore, the bureaucracy took on the role of patron to the various [clients] seeking political favors. All aspects of government were connected by a web of patron-client relationships, from the leader of small villages to the top person in government: Ferdinand Marcos himself. Patrons granted favors, jobs, and prestige; in return, clients provided their support. Through those relationships, Marcos consolidated his new oligarchy. That oligarchy constituted the base of support for the Marcos regime. It consisted of the military, the technocrats and bureaucrats, businesspeople, and cronies of the president, and local leaders. Composed mainly of cabinet members and other national and local government officials, that base of support was formalized through the establishment of the dominant political party, the KBL. In its support of the Marcos government, the party united all the various elite groups; thus, Marcos's absolute power lasted for fourteen years.

Another [client] group to which Marcos needed to pay attention was foreign interests, most particularly the interests of the United States. Without the support of the United States, Marcos would have had difficulty financing domestic client groups. Marcos therefore pursued policies favorable to foreign business interests. He rhetorically claimed to be a nationalist but in practice did not behave as one. He was, in fact, richly rewarded for his support of the United States in the Vietnam War, as well as for his pursuit of policies favorable toward American investment and capital. He also used the U.S. need for military bases to secure economic and military aid for himself.

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ferdinand Marcos and the Philippines: The Political Economy of Authoritarianism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - A Nation Divided 7
  • Chapter 3 - Martial Law and Regime Legitimation 39
  • Chapter 4 - A Complete Government Takeover 73
  • Chapter 5 - The Authoritarian Regime's Network of Support 95
  • Chapter 6 - Decline and Fall of the Dictatorship 125
  • Epilogue - The Philippines, 1986–1996 133
  • Selected Bibliography 135
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 145
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 148

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.