Gambling and the Public Interest

By Peter Collins | Go to book overview

Preface

I hope that this book will be of interest and use to all who are concerned in whatever context—whether as legislators or regulators, as gambling industry professionals or campaigners against gambling, as lawyers or lobbyists, as academic students of commercial gambling or citizens—with the fundamental question [What should the law be regarding gambling?]

Because this is the fundamental question that the book addresses, its central preoccupations are jurisprudential, and the book is composed principally of discussions about what is or would be desirable rather than of descriptions about what is or has been the case. As such, the focus is on arguments and important questions rather than on information and clear-cut answers. For this reason, it is more important that the conclusions of the book be challenging than that they be irresistible.

Another reason why the conclusions offered must often be tentative is that the academic study of gambling behavior and the gambling business is relatively young. There is a great deal—especially in the areas of economics and psychology as they apply to gambling—about which we are as yet uncertain. It is also true that many disagreements about what the law governing gambling ought to be reflect disagreements about matters of moral principle rather than matters of empirical fact. When people dispute issues of principle, argument may compel them to be clear and consistent, to attend accurately to relevant facts, and to give sensitive consideration to alternative moral visions, but the result will be persuasive rather than probative, and in the end the disputants may have to agree to differ.

This is not, however, to suggest that anyone's opinion about what laws governments should pass about gambling is as good as anyone else's. In this, as in other areas, some opinions are better than others because it is true of some opinions, but not of others, that they make use of concepts that are lucid, sub-

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gambling and the Public Interest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - What is Gambling? 15
  • Chapter 3 - Should Gambling Be Legal? 27
  • Chapter 4 - How Should Gambling Be Regulated? 53
  • Chapter 5 - The Economics of Gambling 85
  • Chapter 6 - Problem Gambling 129
  • Chapter 7 - E-Gambling 155
  • Chapter 8 - Gambling and Morality 169
  • Appendix - Reforming Gambling Law in the United Kingdom: a Case Study 179
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 197
  • About the Author 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.