Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

PREFACE

After months of frustrating reviews of contemporary commentaries on globalization, any explanations or opinions seemed either impossibly unclear or simplistically narrow. I reread Ralph Waldo EmersonU+027s elegant admonition of the scholarU+027s duties. Emerson reminds us that scholarship uncovers the "facts amidst appearances" through patient "observation … "by" cataloguing obscure and nebulous stars of the human mind." The scholar must be "selfrelying and self-directed. … He is the worldU+027s eye. He is the worldU+027s heart." His is to communicate "the conclusions of history. Whatsoever oracles the human heart, in all emergencies, in all solemn hours, has uttered as its commentary on the world of actions—these shall he receive and impart. And whatsoever new verdict Reason from her inviolable seat pronounces on the passing men and events of today—this he shall hear and promulgate. … Let him hold by himself; add observation to observation … "and" satisfy himself alone that this day he has seen something truly. … The world is his who can see through its pretension."1 Any explanation of globalization must account for, but not rely on, the commentaries on todayU+027s passing world of actions and current events. It must include the conclusions of history, the heartbeat of humanity, and also peopleU+027s observations.

Within the historical perspective, globalization has been in the heart and eye of humanity since before Aristotle focused both on the good life. Aristotle focused the human mind on globalization when he identified as the fundamental question of public life the ordering of communal society around the good life. As "the chief end, both for the community as a whole and for each of us individually," the good life became synonymous with globalization.2 In seeking an answer to AristotleU+027s question, Ibn Khaldun developed the Science of Civilization (al-'Emran) to explain a current situation and also to suggest a broad pattern for any future order.3 The complex, integrative approach of al-'Emran reflects St. Thomas AquinasU+027s premise that truth is a multilayered, multifaceted phenomenon that human beings can discover in

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Knowledge, Perspectives, and People 1
  • 2: Knowledge and Knowledge Creation 13
  • 3: The Power Ofperspective 33
  • 4: The Idea of Progress 81
  • 5: The Political Perspective 113
  • 6: Cultural Globalization 173
  • 7: The Economic Perspective 219
  • 8: The Double Movement 253
  • 9: The Global Perspective 303
  • Selected Bibliography 339
  • Author Index 371
  • Subject Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.