Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book has emerged over several years through discussions with many colleagues and students and support from numerous people and institutions. The deficiencies, controversies, or oversights that readers will find in my premises, analyses, or presentation have emerged through my own faults and negligence. My themes and the bookU+027s conclusions reflect and include the work of many scholars, managers, diplomats, and students. Over the several years spent in developing my concepts into coherent perceptions of globalization, the endurance, regard, and understanding of my mentors, students, family, and friends have been indispensable. Many gracious colleagues—diplomatic, commercial, and academic—and students have patiently heard, read, and examined my ideas and analyses, and the conclusions in the book. Many have provided useful, undiscovered references, as well as muchneeded criticism and focus. Some of my students have adapted one or another of my themes to their own work in different fields and have introduced me to their own novel ideas and insights.

The staffs of the Ginn Library of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and the Tisch Library of Tufts University have been of immeasurable assistance and support. Not only have they tolerated my unusual research habits, but enthusiastically sought—and found—the arcane references and information that I persisted in demanding. I owe special thanks to Karen Coppock and Ted Johnson, who read the chapters as I constructed them.

My family tolerated my endless papers, notes, and books as I tried to organize what seems to many to be an impossibly complex set of ideas, events, and impressions. The result of an invaluable and very special person, this book is dedicated to my wife, Donna, who has given and tolerated far much more than I have deserved.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Knowledge, Perspectives, and People 1
  • 2: Knowledge and Knowledge Creation 13
  • 3: The Power Ofperspective 33
  • 4: The Idea of Progress 81
  • 5: The Political Perspective 113
  • 6: Cultural Globalization 173
  • 7: The Economic Perspective 219
  • 8: The Double Movement 253
  • 9: The Global Perspective 303
  • Selected Bibliography 339
  • Author Index 371
  • Subject Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.