Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

1
KNOWLEDGE, PERSPECTIVES,
AND PEOPLE

Globalization has become … the most important, economic, political, and
cultural phenomenon of our time.1

So important is this controversial phenomenon that people cannot afford to misunderstand globalization and the broad, global perspective that it has opened to all people everywhere. In the train of the global economy and unfamiliar forms of global governance is a new global culture: a consumer society with a panorama of goods and services, transnational fashions and art, and cosmopolitan personal relationships. New technologies are creating new products, new markets, and new industries and changing the nature of work as production becomes global, telecontrolled, and virtual.2 The proliferation of instant telecommunication and public fascination with global media events threaten to create Marshall McLuhan's global village.3 People redefine culture itself as a source of both individual and social identities, as computer networks circulate ideas, information, and images throughout the world.4 Whereas cosmocrats construct a global information superhighway, many global villagers condemn, resist, and attack a new wave of media-based cultural imperialism.

Although few may appreciate the dimensions of globalism, most people alive today have experienced a personal epiphany in the last few decades when globalization became either frighteningly solid or reassuringly real. For many, connection to the networks of globalization is an empowering experience that enhances the glory and pleasure of living in a globalizing world. These cosmocrats lead growing numbers of carriers in expanding social reality from narrow, local perspectives to a global perspective of life and living. Outside the charmed circle of the few-score million people connected to global telecommunication networks, however, even the idea of globalization seems disempowering. To the unconnected, globalization brings cynicism and hopelessness in the feeling that inexorable market forces cannot be guided by people, regulated by the state, or controlled by God. For many, globalization

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Globalization: People, Perspectives, and Progress
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Knowledge, Perspectives, and People 1
  • 2: Knowledge and Knowledge Creation 13
  • 3: The Power Ofperspective 33
  • 4: The Idea of Progress 81
  • 5: The Political Perspective 113
  • 6: Cultural Globalization 173
  • 7: The Economic Perspective 219
  • 8: The Double Movement 253
  • 9: The Global Perspective 303
  • Selected Bibliography 339
  • Author Index 371
  • Subject Index 379
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