In Real Time: Managing the New Supply Chain

By Sandor Boyson; Lisa H. Harrington et al. | Go to book overview

1
Introduction to the
Real-Time Supply Chain

Case 1. A customer service representative in Atlanta is reviewing an incoming order over the Web. Are the products available to promise to the customer? The representative clicks the [search inventory] icon. Immediately, a software agent interrogates the global database, which includes inventories not only in the company's own warehouses across the United States but also in the warehouses of its supply chain partners in Europe and Asia. The software agent locates the requested products, calculates the guaranteed lead time to source and assemble these items, and determines the most optimal transport route to the customer's site. Elapsed time to execute this process: three seconds.

Case 2. A broker in Singapore is handling a large import order of women's garments for a major retailer. To process the inbound order, the broker needs approvals from 18 agencies that handle customs and trade approvals. The broker logs onto TradeNet, a 24/7 Internet-based system developed by the Singapore Trade Development Board, makes the request, and fills out the necessary forms online. The forms are routed through the 18 different agencies simultaneously. The entire permitting process, which used to take days, is accomplished online within 15 minutes.

These scenarios are becoming increasingly commonplace as organizations rush to embrace technology that will make them leaner and more agile—able to compete more effectively in the global business arena. These two real-world scenarios aptly demonstrate the power of

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In Real Time: Managing the New Supply Chain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Introduction to the Real-Time Supply Chain 1
  • 2: The Internet Mega-Portal 13
  • 3: The Internet Mega-Portal 27
  • 4: Enabling the Enterprise Supply Chain Mega-Portal 45
  • 5: Beyond the Four Walls 67
  • 6: Real-Time Visualization and Modeling of Supply Chains 99
  • 7: Putting the Mega-Portal to Work 123
  • 8: Real-Time Supply Chain Mega-Portals 145
  • Appendix 151
  • Index 157
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