Music History during the Renaissance Period, 1520-1550: A Documented Chronology

By Blanche Gangwere | Go to book overview

Preface

This annotated chronology of western music from ca. 1520 to ca. 1550 is the third of a series of outlines covering the history of music in western civilization. The task of documenting the history and historiography of western music in outline form was undertaken because of the realization that, although there are many excellent books on music history, no single source systematically presents concise information on theory, notation, style, performance practices, composition, and music, by incorporating findings from primary sources and the results of subsequent scholarly research. Researchers seeking accurate information at present must consult a wide array of specialized books and periodicals, not all of which may be familiar or readily available. In addition, considerable background knowledge may be needed to assess these materials.

Therefore, in developing the outline for this book, an attempt was made to consult all types of sources, to cover as many facets of importance as possible, and to present the facts in an organized manner. Each topic is presented separately and written chronologically. Thus a vast amount of data is digested for ready access, and further information may be obtained from the sources noted.

As a convenience to researchers, it was decided to document each line of the outline. Abbreviations are used to refer to the sources that are cited in the bibliography. If the larger part of a section is from one source, the abbreviations are placed after the appropriate heading, with only those few lines that are from other sources having separate abbreviations. The bibliography lists these abbreviations alphabetically without regard to whether the sources are books, periodical articles, or music. The nature of the material is made clear in the citation.

All references to pitch are relative as they refer to the pitches of the gamut and those of the extended interlocking hexachords. All square brackets found in the text indicate additions to the material found in the source quoted.

The period covered in this book is the second part of what is commonly known as the Renaissance. The Italian word rinascita was used by Matteo Palmieri in the fifteenth century and established by Vasari in 1550. The term Renaissance, denoting a period in European history, was first used in 1855. There has been much controversy as to the meaning of the term and the dates of the historical period it covers. There has been no attempt in this book to define the word or to give the period a definite time frame.

-ix-

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Music History during the Renaissance Period, 1520-1550: A Documented Chronology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in the Music Reference Collection ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Reference Material xi
  • Bibliography 1
  • Part II: Historical Outline and Study Guide 122
  • Theorists and Theoretical Sources 123
  • Musica Theorica: Science of Music 137
  • Musica Practica: Performance Didactics 154
  • Musica Poëtica: Composition 177
  • Notation 184
  • Sacred Latin Music for the Catholic Church on the Continent 199
  • Sacred Music for the Reformed Church on the Continent 256
  • Sacred Latin and Vernacular Music in England 295
  • Secular Vocal Music 366
  • Instrumental Music 455
  • Index of Persons 507
  • Index of Works 511
  • Subject Index 527
  • About the Author 537
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