Inventing the Electronic Century: The Epic Story of the Consumer Electronics and Computer Industries

By Alfred D. Chandler Jr. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Of the several persons who made possible the writing of this book, the most important were the two to whom I have dedicated it—Anne O'Connell and my wife, Fay Chandler. Anne, for the past decade, has been transcribing my garbled, dictated, handwritten copy into smooth readable typescript, at the same time keeping the numerous variations of the text and the endnotes in their proper place and order. As critical was Fay's constant encouragement and support, which becomes increasingly valuable as I begin life's ninth decade.

Nor would the book have been written without the assistance of Takashi Hikino and Andrew von Nordenflycht. Before Takashi had to return to his homeland, Japan, his assistance was essential in getting what has become two books underway as well as in the writing of the initial drafts of the chapters. Andrew played as critical a role in the completion of the book, for his computer skills and his knowledge of the computer industry helped to make up for my limited technical knowledge. His committed work on the final draft made possible the completion of Book One on schedule.

Nor could the book have been written without the support of the Harvard Business School. I am grateful to both Dean John H. McArthur and Dean

-vii-

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Inventing the Electronic Century: The Epic Story of the Consumer Electronics and Computer Industries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Harvard Studies in Business History, 47 i
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Consumer Electronics 13
  • 3: Consumer Electronics 50
  • 4: Mainframes and Minicomputers 82
  • 5: The Micrdprdcessdr Revolution 132
  • 6: The National Competitors 177
  • 7: The Consumer Electronics and Computer Industries as the Electronic Century Begins 216
  • 8: The Significance of the Epic Stdry 238
  • Appendices 259
  • Notes 275
  • Index 307
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