Teaching to Promote Intellectual and Personal Maturity: Incorporating Students' Worldviews and Identities into the Learning Process

By Marcia B. Baxter Magolda | Go to book overview

The author draws on the work of John Dewey, George
Herbert Mead, and contemporary critical theorists to
explore service learning’s contribution to democratic
citizenship. Central to the discussion is the author’s
concept of the “caring self.”


4
Democratic Citizenship and Service
Learning: Advancing the Caring Self

Robert A. Rhoads

The intent of this chapter is to advance research and theory on service learning and identity development. Specifically, I explore the concept of the “caring self,” which I argue is vital to contemporary conceptions of teaching and learning. Defined in simplest terms, the caring self is a sense of self firmly rooted in a concern for the well-being of others. As I will argue, caring selves are crucial to a multicultural, democratic society.

Conceptions of democracy lie at the very heart of how we think about education and the teaching and learning processes we employ in working with college students. Consequently, throughout this chapter, I adopt an Aristotelian view of governance in which every member of a given society is believed to have the potential to influence public life and to become a caring and concerned citizen. In addition, a pragmatic assumption lies at the heart of my analysis: Colleges and universities exist in part to advance the social good. Although there are a variety of ways in which institutions of higher learning might contribute to the social good (advancing knowledge, economic development, community outreach, and so forth), one key contribution involves preparing students as concerned citizens through educational activities such as service learning.

In what follows, I discuss John Dewey’s contribution to education and citizenship. I then link Dewey’s vision of democratic citizenship with George Herbert Mead’s work on the “social self,” arguing that a democratic society thrives only when its citizens have a deep concern for others. I build upon the work of Dewey, Mead, and more contemporary critical and feminist theorists as I elaborate the caring self and introduce empirical research drawn from student participation in community service. I conclude by offering

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching to Promote Intellectual and Personal Maturity: Incorporating Students' Worldviews and Identities into the Learning Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.