Foreword

The Tavistock Clinic has an international reputation as a centre of excellence for training, clinical mental health work, research and scholarship. Established in 1920, its historyis one of groundbreaking work. The original aim of the Clinic was to offer treatment which could be used as the basis of research into the social prevention and treatment of mental health problems, and to teach these emerging skills to other professionals. Later work turned towards the treatment of trauma, the understanding of conscious and unconscious processes in groups, as well as important and influential work in developmental psychology. Work in perinatal bereavement led to a new understanding within the medical profession of the experience of stillbirth, and of the development of new forms of support for mourning parents and families. The development in the 1950s and 1960s of a systemic model of psychotherapy, focusing on the interaction between children and parents and within families, has grown into the substantial bodyof theoretical knowledge and therapeutic techniques used in the Tavistock's training and research in family therapy.

The Understanding Your Child series has an important place in the history of the Tavistock Clinic. It has been issued in completely new form three times: in the 1960s, the 1990s, and in 2004. Each time the authors, drawing on their clinical background and specialist training, have set out to reflect on the extraordinary story of 'ordinary development' as it was observed and experienced at the time. Society changes, of course, and so has this series, as it attempts to make sense of everyday accounts of the ways in which a developing child interacts with his or her parents, carers and the wider world. But within this changing scene there has been something constant, and it is best described as a continuing enthusiasm for a view of

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Understanding 6-7-Year-Olds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Understanding Your Child Series 2
  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Introduction 11
  • 1: A Changing Sense of Self 15
  • 2: A Place in the Family 23
  • 3: The Experience of School 31
  • 4: Making Friends 41
  • 5: Reading for Meaning 51
  • 6: Confusions and Anxieties 59
  • Conclusion: Celebrating Achievement and Moving on 69
  • Further Reading 73
  • Helpful Organizations 75
  • Index 77
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