Video Modelling and Behaviour Analysis: A Guide for Teaching Social Skills to Children with Autism

By Christos Nikopoulos; Mickey Keenan | Go to book overview

Preface

Autism is considered the fastest growing serious developmental disorder while some reports indicate that a new case of autism is diagnosed nearly every 20 minutes (e.g. Princeton Child Development Institute 2005). Social impairments of children with autism are of particular concern because they prevent the normal interactions inherent in every social situation. Research findings suggest that when the rate of social initiations increases, social behaviour generally improves. Unfortunately, the treatment procedures available to make this happen are rather limited. Impairments in play and imitation skills have also been identified as key areas of any treatment programme. However, unless a specific training programme is designed to address these particular deficits children remain dependent on explicit cues for them to be able to engage in a sequence of activities that involve social interactions. Most of the effective procedures for enhancing the social skills of children with autism have used mainly typically developing peers with a variety of methods. The implication is that unless a child with autism attends a mainstream school setting variations of these procedures cannot be applied to the treatment of their social deficits. Bearing in mind the broad nature of each child's social development, the remediation of the social deficits that appear in autism remains one of the most daunting challenges for researchers and educators.

Applied behaviour analysis (ABA) has a long history of over four decades of significant and successful strategy development, verification and generali– sation in the treatment of individuals with autism. One of the many effective behavioural strategies for dealing with autism is video modelling. Video is regarded as an expanding technological medium for bringing about

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Video Modelling and Behaviour Analysis: A Guide for Teaching Social Skills to Children with Autism
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