Mothering through Domestic Violence

By Lorraine Radford; Marianne Hester | Go to book overview

Subject
Index
Pages in italics refer to figures and tables.
acting out, children 68, 71–2
actuarial risk assessment 126
Adoption and Children Act (2002) 60
African-American women, and gender entrapment 28–9
alcohol problems 23, 26
ambivalence of mothers 32, 44–7, 88–9
AMICA study 15, 86–97, 106, 108–9
assessment of contact safety 121–33
attachment theory 133–4
Barnardos study 68, 70, 71–2, 75, 76, 80–1, 144, 146, 147
'battered woman' stereotype 38–9
bedwetting 68, 71, 90, 96–7, 137
blaming of mothers 60–1, 102–20, 143–5
bullying, legalized 115–16
CAFCASS practitioners 98, 104–5, 112, 119
Charm Syndrome, The (Horley) 41
child abuse
link to domestic violence 52–3
UK research 53–9
refuge support 49–50
as result of contact 94–7
child care, control over 33–4
child contact see contact
child deaths 57–8, 116–17
child protection
incorporating domestic violence 149–52
services 139–41
studies 55–6, 58–9
child visitation see contact
children
acting out 68, 71–2
attachment trauma 133–4
'best interests' of 117–18
coerced by courts 116d
coping strategies 77–81
domestic violence research 50–9
fears for mothers 83
forced into abuse of mother 32, 100–1
impact of domestic violence on 66–72
leaving with abusive partner 36–7
protection by mothers 42–4
protection of mothers 77–9
used as ransom 35–6
resilience of 73–7
rights of 85, 97
sexual abuse of 63, 94–5, 96
witnessing violence 43, 57, 59–62
see also contact
Children Act (1989) 12, 61, 97–8, 141, 147
'co-parenting' 8, 84, 103, 107
coerced agreements 105
Conflicts Tactics Scale 51
contact 82–3
children's views 97–9
and children's welfare 85–6
court proceedings 99–100
disputes over 83–4
health implications 96–7
leading child abuse 94–7
legislation reforms 117–18
maintaining 88–9
mothers' reasons for 87–8
mothers' reasons for opposing 89–90
purpose of 107–8
repeated court applications 112
research on 86–7
as route to abuse of mother 90–4
safety issues 121–33
supervised 135–8
contact centres 137–8
contact study 10–12, 54, 57, 63, 68, 70–1, 78–9, 86–96
coping strategies
of children 77–81
of mothers 40–2
court procedures, legalized
secondary assault of women 99–100
court welfare, survey of 13–14
crime, link to violence against women 28–9
crime surveys 19–20
criminalization of DV 9
cumulative harm, from witnessing violence 61
'custody', as outdated term 83
'cycle of abuse' 73
deaths see child deaths; homicides; premature deaths; suicide
depression 25–6
developmental delays 69–71
disability 21, 23–4
disclosure
by children 76
tools for 153–6
women's fear of 103–4, 106
domestic violence, range of 20
drug problems 23, 26
Duluth wheels 153–6
educational achievement 70–1
empowerment of women 153, 155–6
'equality' wheel 153–6
'experts', in court proceedings 124–5
extended families 34–5
false allegations, mothers accused of 112–15
'false positives' of lethality indicators 128
family law, reinforcing behaviour of perpetrators 103–15
Family Law Act (1996), England 12, 143, 147
Family Law Reform Act (1995), Australia 118, 119
fathers
'good enough' 141, 142, 143, 144
jealousy of newborns 30–1
parenting programmes 134–5
responsibility for violence ignored 111
violent but good 145–7
visibility of 147
father's rights campaigns 83, 103, 107
follow-up survey 13–14
'friendly parent provisions', US courts 105–6
gender entrapment 28–9, 47
good practice guidelines, UK 118–19
'Greenbook' initiative, US 118

-172-

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