Teaching Children with Autism and Related Spectrum Disorders: An Art and a Science

By Christy L. Magnusen | Go to book overview

Foreword

Christy Magnusen has worked with many children with varying degrees of autism over several decades and has been in hundreds of classrooms. She has read, analysed and applied in the classroom the main theoretical texts for education, speech therapy and autism. She has theoretical knowledge and practical experience as well as a level of enthusiasm, dedication and creativity that make her an exceptional therapist and specialist in autism. Christy also has an intuitive insight into how an autistic child thinks, communicates and learns. If I had a child with autism, I would want Christy Magnusen to be my child's teacher or therapist.

Her intention in writing this book was to help people be hopeful and excited about teaching children with autism. She has certainly succeeded. The explanations of theoretical models and practical strategies will improve the abilities and confidence of teachers and thereby improve the quality of life of children with autism and their parents. Christy rightly considers that teaching children with autism is an art and a science, a mixture of theatre and theory. As I read her book I became infected with her enthusiasm and inspired by her recommendations. She really understands autism and what to do in the classroom.

This book is essential reading for teachers and parents, and will be their guide to the range of educational options suitable for a particular child, taking into account that child's profile of abilities and learning style. Although this may be a small volume, I know that

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Teaching Children with Autism and Related Spectrum Disorders: An Art and a Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgment 6
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Preface 11
  • Chapter 1 - The Big Picture 13
  • Chapter 2 - How Children with Autism Think and Learn 15
  • Chapter 3 - Putting Theory into Practice 19
  • Chapter 4 - An Integrated Approach 25
  • Chapter 5 - Planning Strategies 41
  • Chapter 6 - Instructional Strategies 51
  • Conclusion 97
  • References 99
  • Further Reading 103
  • Subject Index 121
  • Author Index 125
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