Conduct Disorder and Behavioural Parent Training: Research and Practice

By Dermot O'Reilly | Go to book overview

Afterword

Behaviour parenting training (BPT) is distinguished from parent training in general because of its commitment both to behavioural principles and to evaluation. While there has been a proliferation of parent training programmes during the last 25 years, many programmes now availableto practitioners lack a solid theoretical foundation and have not been thoroughly evaluated. Within the field of BPT, however, three programmes have emerged as pre-eminent, and have been dealt with extensively in this book: first, Helping the Noncompliant Child (Forehand and McMahon 1981), which adopts a clinic-based training format; second, the Incredible Years programme (IY), which adopts a group-training format with videotape modelling (Webster-Stratton 1992a). and third, child management training (CMT) (Sanders and Dadds 1982; Sanders and Christensen 1985), which adopts a home-based observation and feedback format. BPT has also benefited greatly from the sustained efforts of a number of eminent researchers including Gerald Patterson, Robert Wahler and Frances Gardner. These researchers have made an enormous contribution to the field, and their many and sustained studies have been referred to throughout this book. Their work reflects the close interaction between practice and research which has been a feature of BPT.

A survey of the contentof the three programmes referred toabove indicates that BPT has adopted the strategy of training loosely by teaching parents a broad range of skills, rather than concentrating upon a single strategy. While these three programmes differ in many aspects, such as the training format, the programme materials and the frequency of client contact, their content is broadly similar and includes the following basic elements: positive parenting practices including praise and rewards, ignoring, compliance training and non-coercive discipline. The loose training strategy of BPT provides parents with a broad range of skills with which to respond to the diversity of challenging behaviours that children with con

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