Asperger's Syndrome in Young Children: A Developmental Guide for Parents and Professionals

By Laurie Leventhal-Belfer; Cassandra Coe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Paths of Intervention
From Traditional to Alternative

The most common question from parents of children with Asperger's Syndrome is whether they are doing everything they possibly can to help their child. In this chapter we will explore a wide range of interventions that both parents and professionals may consider at different points in the child's development. The chapter does not focus on interventions targeted specifically at young children with Asperger's Syndrome since those interventions are discussed in greater detail throughout the remainder of this book. Instead, the chapter examines the ways in which more traditional and alternative interventions may be helpful for a child with Asperger's Syndrome and his family at different stages of his development, and provides some information about the growing body of alternative interventions. The chapter also contains a section on when medication may be helpful. Since the authors are not physicians, and the practice of medication therapy is changing rapidly, we will not recommend specific drugs but rather we will explore what to think about when determining if one should see a child psychiatrist for a medication consultation.


Individual psychotherapy for children with Asperger's
Syndrome

Individual play therapy is a form of treatment that is familiar to many parents. Some may feel that there is a stigma to having a child in therapy but many are relieved to have a professional involved, someone who they believe can play a significant role in furthering their child's development. Therefore, an important question for parents of children with Asperger's Syndrome is whether they should be seeking such services for their child. Most experts in the field have concluded that traditional, intensive, insight-oriented psychotherapy is

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