Asperger's Syndrome in Young Children: A Developmental Guide for Parents and Professionals

By Laurie Leventhal-Belfer; Cassandra Coe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11
Building Connections with the Child's School

One of the biggest challenges parents face is finding a school environment that will meet the needs of their young child with Asperger's Syndrome. Parents often have many fears about their children making friends and fitting in. They may wonder if they should share the diagnosis or worry that the sharing might bias a school/teacher against their child. Typically it is those schools (teachers) which are willing to work with the parents and support the process of collaboration after they have been informed about the child's diagnosis that best meet the needs of the child. The partnership between home and school is a critical alliance for ensuring the young child with Asperger's Syndrome is understood and interventions are consistent across settings. This chapter will discuss building a home–school partnership as well as the multiple questions that often surface for parents and teachers when thinking about how to best prepare a child for preschool or kindergarten and also how to best prepare the school. Teachers and caregivers go through a process similar to parents as they begin to understand the needs of their young students. This chapter will also emphasize the perspective of the teacher and the importance of making sure that they are provided with support as well.


How do I know if a child is ready for a preschool program?

Most children can benefit from a preschool experience that helps prepare them to be part of a small group, communicate, socialize, follow simple rules, and be comfortable separating from their parent before they enter kindergarten. Because these present special challenges for young children with Asperger's Syndrome, they will very much benefit from some practice in all of these areas. Therefore, finding a good school environment that can support them is the essential task at hand.

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