The Perspectives of People with Dementia: Research Methods and Motivations

By Heather Wilkinson | Go to book overview

Chapter Nine

Successes and challenges in using focus
groups with older people with dementia

Claire Bamford and Errollyn Bruce

Therapeutic group work with people with dementia is well established (Cheston 1996; Feil 1993; Gibson 1993; Yale 1991) and has demonstrated the ability of people with dementia to work together in groups. In contrast, the use of focus groups to explore the views and experiences of people with dementia has received little attention. Focus groups are an increasingly popular method in social research and have been used to explore a diverse range of topics in a variety of contexts (Barbour and Kitzinger 1999; Morgan 1993; Vaughn, Schumm and Sinagub 1996). It has been argued that focus groups are particularly appropriate for research with people with limited power and influence (Morgan and Krueger 1993), suggesting that they might be a useful way of involving people with dementia in research. The defining characteristic of focus groups is the use of group process and interaction between participants to generate data (Kitzinger and Farquhar 1999). By prompting an exchange of views and opportunities to hear and react to the views and experiences of other participants, focus groups can provide insight into both how and why people think as they do (Morgan 1997).

The aim of this chapter is to reflect on the use of focus groups in researching the perspectives of people with dementia. We begin by looking at the practical tasks of identifying potential participants, obtaining consent, and organising and running the groups. The method is then

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Perspectives of People with Dementia: Research Methods and Motivations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.