The Perspectives of People with Dementia: Research Methods and Motivations

By Heather Wilkinson | Go to book overview

Subject index
absent-mindedness 32
accessing participants and gaining consent 58–9
action checklists 28
Action on Dementia see under Alzheimer Scotland
Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000 9, 66–7, 183, 184, 188
advance consent directives 51–2, 65–6, 68
advisory networks and user panels 83–97
benefits of user panel to research 94–5
consumer involvement 83–4
establishing user panel 86–7
form of user panel 87–9
how have panel members found the process? 92–4
involving people with dementia in user panel 84
log of activities over 12 weeks 89
phases of research project 85
purpose of user panel 84–6
what does panel do? 90
ageism 9, 236
agitation 31
alcohol abuse 184
misdiagnosis of 103
Alzheimer's disease (AD) 32, 58, 93, 112, 169, 170, 178, 184, 200
should people with Alzheimer's take part in research? 101–7
Alzheimer Scotland 102, 106, 110, 111, 112, 187
Action on Dementia (ASAD) 110, 111, 112–13, 187, 205
Alzheimer's Society 84, 86
Alzheimer's Society of India 230
ambiguities and problems with consent 143–4
American Geriatrics Society 65, 68
anti-depressants 101
anti-Alzheimer medication 29, 178
anxiety 33, 36, 37, 41, 51, 93
Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh 106
assent, seeking 52–3
assessment 27, 64–5
of competency 53–4
attitudes encountered by James 114
autonomy 13
baby talkers (attitude encountered by James) 114
Bangladesh(is) 228, 230, 233
BASOLL see Behavioural Scale of Later Life
BBC 106
behavioural consent 66
Behavioural Scale of Later Life (BASOLL) 56
beneficence 49
bi-polar disorders 184
Bradford Dementia Group 30
Brenda (worker at Turning Point) 111
British Psychological Society 68
British Society of Gerontology 68
British Sociological Association 68
Code of Ethical Practice 235
cannots (attitude encountered by James) 114
caregiving 34
care home managers 27, 57
care home residents 54
carers 26, 34, 55, 86–8, 92, 143, 199
role of 168–9
case records, analysis of 55
challenging behaviour 56, 119
children 37, 39–40
clinical research 47
coercion 57
cognitive abilities 16–17
cognitive behaviour therapy 31
cognitive difficulties 195–6
cognitive impairment 51
cognitive screening 30, 31
collaboration vs. control 127–8
collaborative approach to data collection 35, 41
Comic Relief 106
Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) 236
common sense approach to research 49
Communication and Consultation (Allan) 117
communication difficulties 71
community
care 55
psychiatric nurses (CPNs) 32, 143, 186–7, 190, 202–3, 204
psychology methodology 166
competency
assessment of 53–4
intermittent 65, 78
lack of 51
comprehension difficulties 71
computers 105, 198
concerned (attitude encountered by James) 114
confidence 131
confidentiality 135, 145, 203
agreement 53
and openness 198–200
confusion 31, 104
consent 58, 87, 119, 211–14, 234–5
ambiguities and problems with 143–4
behavioural 66
continuous 67
form 70–1
informed 38, 48, 50–3, 63–4, 68, 70, 71, 73–5, 77, 78, 87
monitoring 79
negotiated 66
process and perspectives of older people in institutional care 63–80
assessment 64–5

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