Tales, Then and Now: More Folktales as Literary Fictions for Young Adults

By Anna E. Altmann; Gail De Vos | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
UPDATES TO NEW
TALES FOR OLD

In the few years since the publication of New Tales for Old there has been a steady stream of reworkings of the tales we discussed in that book. This chapter is an attempt to update that volume. Of course we realize that by the time you are holding this volume in your hands, another update could be forthcoming.


"Cinderella"

Novels

1992. Pratchett, Terry. Witches Abroad. London: Corgi.

An attempt to describe any book by Terry Pratchett is likely to lead to a surfeit of adjectives and a string of quotations. Pratchett is a best-selling writer in Great Britain because his work is funny in so many different ways—clever, hilarious, witty, slapstick, intertextual—and at the same time full of intelligent insight into what it is to be human and to tell stories:

Stories exist independently of their players. If you know that, the
knowledge is power.

Stories, great flapping ribbons of shaped space-time, have been
blowing and uncoiling around the universe since the beginning
of time. And they have evolved. The weakest have died and the
strongest have survived, and they have grown fat on the retelling …,
twisting and blowing through the darkness. (8)

In this complicated version of the Cinderella story, fairy godmothers come in twos. The good ones are kind, and the bad ones are powerful. Cinderella's good godmother dies, but she leaves her responsibility for the girl to Pratchett's trio of witches: hapless Magrat Garlick, earthy Nanny Ogg, and cantankerous Granny

-237-

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Tales, Then and Now: More Folktales as Literary Fictions for Young Adults
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Chapter 1 - Beauty and the Beast 1
  • Chapter 2 - Jack and His Stories 51
  • Chapter 3 87
  • Chapter 4 - Andersen and Three Tales 139
  • Chapter 5 - The Little Mermaid 175
  • Chapter 6 - The Wild Swans 209
  • Chapter 7 - Updates to New Tales for Old 237
  • Appendix 259
  • Author/Illustrator Index 275
  • Motif Index 285
  • Tale Index 289
  • Title Index 291
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