Cultural Readings of Imperialism: Edward Said and the Gravity of History

By Keith Ansell-Pearson; Benita Parry et al. | Go to book overview

TRANSNATIONALISM AND THE ALLEGED DEATH
OF THE NATION-STATE

Neil Lazarus

Over the course of the past decade, and, for very obvious geopolitical reasons especially since 1989, there has been something of an obsessive return to the subject of nationalism in Western-based cultural, historical, and social scientific scholarship. The unfolding of events in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in India, in southern, central, and north eastern Africa, in the Maghreb, the Mashriq, and elsewhere, was nowhere anticipated. Despite this, the outpouring of Western based scholarship has tended to remain within the parameters of the established post-1945 ideologeme of nationalism: 'since the Second World War, in a conveniently European lapse of memory', as Tim Brennan has recently pointed out, 'studies of nationalism have not only increased; they have for the most part condemned the thing they studied.'1 The sheet destructiveness of contemporary developments in Rwanda, Armenia and Azerbaijan, and in what less than five years ago was still Yugoslavia, has been taken to reveal a fundamental truth about all nationalisms everywhere: not merely that they are chauvinistic, but also that they only ever result in the violent intensification of already existing social divisions.

There is, of course, something deeply disingenuous about this kind of scholarship, emanating as it does from think tanks, policy centres and institutions of higher learning in the core capitalist nations of Britain, France, Germany, and the United States. The contemporary studies that deplore the 'resurgence' or 'persistence' of nationalism in Algeria or Serbia or Tajikistan are very often premised upon a convenient naturalisation of the trajectories of nationalism in the metropolitan West. 'Our' nationalisms, classed as finished projects, are taken somehow to have had benign effects: modernising, unifying, democratising.

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cultural Readings of Imperialism: Edward Said and the Gravity of History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.