Launch Your Career in College: Strategies for Students, Educators, and Parents

By Adele M. Scheele | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am lucky to have Susan Slesinger, Praeger Publishers' Editor, as a true friend. She is not only a brilliant editor, but she is also encouraging and empathetic, a rare combination. And she shares my profound belief that the ideas in this book deserve to live.

I also have had the good fortune to have Ann Morey, my genius successor as director of Cal State Northridge's career center, at my side for nine years. She has enthusiastically joined me in extending the notion that a student can transform a meager life of waiting in line for life to happen into the adventure of an explorer of all that college can offer. Victor Diamante has been my computer savior, guru, and formatter; I hired him as a part-time tech assistant when he was a freshman, and now he works full-time in a larger department. Technologically intuitive, he has never, ever let me down. Thanks, too, to Nancy Worsham, who gathered student FAQs and helped put ideas in order.

I am indebted to great friends whose support has meant so much. Millie Loeb has always been a source of strength and ready repartee on the promise of books, college, politics, and work. Nancy Hathaway, a writer herself, read my manuscript at the eleventh hour and buoyed me up with her enthusiasm for these ideas, which do not usually appear in college books. Janet Albaugh, with her succinct and precise knowledge and style, turned endless lists into paragraphs and helped reorganize ideas.

In my own college experience, enrolling in three academic programs, each seven years apart, I sought out the best professors I could find. I was rewarded every time. In ways they will never know, each of them inspired me and helped shape my life. Here are just some of their names to share with you: at the University of Pennsylvania's undergraduate program, Woody Woodhouse, Moshe Greenberg, and Morse Peckam; at Cal State Northridge's Graduate English Fellowship, Harry Stone and Ann Stanford; and at UCLA in the Change Management Doctoral Fellowship, Helen S. Astin, a courageous and inspiring mentor, who chaired my dissertation committee and became a lifelong friend.

-xv-

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