Winning the Interview Game: Everything You Need to Know to Land the Job

By Alan H. Nierenberg | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Differentiate Yourself:
Second and Subsequent
Interviews

Interviewing is not a gentle sport. The game reaches a crescendo going into the second round of interviews as you now compete with a small number of candidates, perhaps less than five. Each competitor must be eliminated before you can win the interview game. Interviewers will dispose of a few, but you must help them to remove the rest.

This chapter describes aggressive tactics to differentiate you and to build on the great perception created in the first interview. Candidates who reach second and subsequent rounds normally satisfy basic requirements for the position, and those who differentiate themselves in as many ways as possible will remain standing at the end of the day. Remaining focused, impressing interviewers in subsequent interviews, gathering competitive intelligence, and applying powerful differentiation techniques are presented in this chapter.


Focus

Many job seekers who get this far develop the false impression of being in the homestretch and they let their guard down. Some of these candidates established a great rapport with company managers and begin to [loosen up] and share weaknesses that they successfully avoided sharing in the early interviews. That is a fatal trap set by experienced interviewers. Keep in mind that there are only a few candidates being interviewed at this stage of the process, and all of you generally satisfy the position requirements. It is only a matter of degree based largely on soft skills and a weak compliance with a particular requirement that separates one candidate from another. You are still selling—do not be lulled into a state of true confessions.

Do not do due diligence. The urge to ask questions that will help you to decide if this is the company you want to work for must be

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