Designing Dynamic Organizations: A Hands-On Guide for Leaders at All Levels

By Jay Galbraith; Diane Downey et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
PEOPLE PRACTICES

People practices are the collective human resources (HR) systems and policies of the organization. They include selection and staffing, performance feedback and management, training, development, and careers. Up to this point in this book, we have discussed how to align the organization's structure, processes, and metric and rewards to the strategy. People practices are the final point on the star model (Figure 6–1). However, this is not to imply that the consideration of people comes last in the design process. Staffing the organization is an issue that will arise as soon as any structural changes are contemplated. In fact, getting the right senior team in place may be one of your first priorities and a key factor in the success of the design and implementation process.

A challenge in designing dynamic organizations is to create systems that will attract, develop, and retain people whose individual and collective capabilities can support the current direction and yet who are flexible enough to be refocused and redeployed when that direction changes. We made the point in the preface of this book that having the right people won't compensate for the lack of other essential organizational elements. Their talent will be wasted if the structure, processes, and metrics dissipate their energy and create barriers to their collective effectiveness. On the other hand, no matter how well designed, no business can realize its goals without the right people in place—people with the right mind-set, skills, and ability to grow and learn with the organization.

In Chapter Two we looked at how each strategic focus—product, operations, customer—leads to different processes, measures, and culture (refer back

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Designing Dynamic Organizations: A Hands-On Guide for Leaders at All Levels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter One - Getting Started 1
  • Chapter Two - Determining the Design Framework 22
  • Chapter Three - Designing the Structure 58
  • Chapter Four - Processes and Lateral Capability 134
  • Chapter Five - Defining and Rewarding Success 189
  • Chapter Six - People Practices 227
  • Chapter Seven - Implementation 253
  • Conclusion 271
  • Glossary of Terms 272
  • Bibliography 276
  • Index 281
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.