Designing Dynamic Organizations: A Hands-On Guide for Leaders at All Levels

By Jay Galbraith; Diane Downey et al. | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

This book has provided a guide for designing a dynamic organization—an organization that can be easily and proactively reconfigured to take advantage of market opportunities and that views organization design as a competitive advantage. If you are using this book in whole or in part as you are redesigning your own organization, you have deepened your own organization design competency.

Although the future is unpredictable, we can be sure there will continue to be change. Leaders who know how to complement sound strategies with the right organizational structures and capabilities will hold the key to developing the flexibility, coordination, and nimbleness that organizations of all sizes require in today's environment. Leaders who understand how integral performance measurement, rewards, and other human resource systems are to the success of their design decisions will be able to realize the power of an aligned organization. Finally, leaders who help their organizations develop collective competence in asking the right questions, making informed decisions, and implementing with attention to both the needs of the business and the individual will be successful in building the dynamic organizations of the future.

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Designing Dynamic Organizations: A Hands-On Guide for Leaders at All Levels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter One - Getting Started 1
  • Chapter Two - Determining the Design Framework 22
  • Chapter Three - Designing the Structure 58
  • Chapter Four - Processes and Lateral Capability 134
  • Chapter Five - Defining and Rewarding Success 189
  • Chapter Six - People Practices 227
  • Chapter Seven - Implementation 253
  • Conclusion 271
  • Glossary of Terms 272
  • Bibliography 276
  • Index 281
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