The Little Black Book of Project Management

By Michael C. Thomsett | Go to book overview

2
Creating the Plan

Beyond the loathing and the fear lies one of the best-kept secrets in

American business. "Planning," it turns out, is really no

more—and no less—than another word for good management.

—BRUCE G. POSNER—

"Planning is the key," the project manager explained to her assis-
tant as their lunch came to an end. "I invited you here today to
emphasize that point. As part of this team, I expect you to under-
stand the importance of planning ahead."

She stopped as the waiter approached and accepted the tab. She
looked at the total for a moment, then whispered to her assistant,
"Can you lend me twenty dollars?"

All successful projects begin with a clear definition of the end result. You need to identify the purpose and structure of the job, what the outcome will look like upon completion, the problems that will be solved, and the objectives you need to meet in your capacity of project manager. Before you actually begin work on any project, be sure that you ask these questions:
Exactly what objectives am I expected to meet? Has the project been defined well enough so that you understand your assignment?

-19-

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The Little Black Book of Project Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction xi
  • 1: Organizing for the Long Term 1
  • 2: Creating the Plan 19
  • 3: Choosing the Project Team 37
  • 4: Preparing the Project Budget 54
  • 5: Establishing a Schedule 71
  • 6: Flowcharting for Project Control 85
  • 7: Designing the Project Flowchart 100
  • 8: Writing the Supporting Documentation 120
  • 9: Conducting the Project Review 137
  • 10: The Communication Challenge 152
  • 11: Project Management and Your Career 171
  • Appendix 184
  • Index 201
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