Artful Persuasion: How to Command Attention, Change Minds, and Influence People

By Harry Mills | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe a tremendous debt to my many clients and seminar participants who have helped to test and refine the materials.

I want to especially thank all those who agreed to review the manuscript in its various drafts. I thank people here in alphabetical order:

Rod Alford, Scott Archibald, John Baird, Kim Barkel, Paul Bell, Chris Beuth, Margo Black, Pat Blades, David Butler, Bryce Campbell, Alastair Carruthers, Robert Cattel, Mike Chan, Ed Cooley, Ron Cooper, Alistair Davis, Jillian de Beer, Anne de Salis, Wayne Deeth, David Evans, Grahame Evans, Brad Goddings, Michael Guggenheimer, James Hall, Keith Harris, Warwick Harvie, Philip Hines, Garry Hora, Geer Iseke, Vic Johnston, Tim Jones, Mandy Kells, Roger Kerr, Alan Kirby Horst Kolo, Gerri Learmonth, Colin Lee, John Link, Errol Lizzamore, Phil Lloyd, Chris Marshall, Phil McCarroll, Ian Macdonald, Gary McIver, Viv McGowan, Patrick Middleton, Craig Mills, Rada Millwood, Stephanie Moore, Spencer Morris, Ross Morten, Julian Nalepa, Phil Neilson, Mick O'Driscoll, Mike O'Neil, Grant O'Riley, Jim Palmer, Debbie Pattulo, Peter Russell, Pam Sharp, Trudy Shay Petty, Jim Sherwin, Alan Simpson, Daljit Singh, Mike Skilling, Russell Smith, Paul Steele, Vicki Steele, Peter Stone, Mike Suggate, Gaynor Thomas, Ken Thomas, Shane Tiernan, Roy Trimbel, Christine Tubbs, Michael Ulmer, Elizabeth Valentine, Cathy Wagner, Jane Walker, John Walker, Lesley Walker, Mark Wallwork, Brian Walshe, Peter Watson, Murray Wham, Bryce Wilkinson, Lee Wilkinson.

This book would not exist if it hadn't been for Jan Harrison, my office manager. Thank you for everything.

Finally there is my wife, Mary Anne, and my two loving daughters, Alicia and Amy. Their love and support give meaning to everything I do.

-xix-

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