Questions That Work: How to Ask Questions That Will Help You Succeed in Any Business Situation

By Andrew Finlayson | Go to book overview

Conclusion

I began this book with the aim of creating a questioning “manifesto.” My intent was provocative, even revolutionary, but some warned the word “manifesto” suggested too political an approach. The thesis of Questions That Work is revolutionary compared with that of many other business books that approach the world with their series of “right answers.” Too many writers argue a point, never opening the door to the reader's spirit of inquiry. The question set format of this book is also radical, but, the source of radical being radix, meaning root or source, is an approach that brings us back to the very starting point of thought. With passionate conviction I believe life is a series of questions, for the very essence of the human condition is one of questioning. Questions and answers are a part of all of us, a rhythm as old as the call and response of humanity's earliest music, music that reaches back to a time before language.

The introductory essays in Questions That Work argue that a wellasked question sets you apart from others by demonstrating the strength of your insight while downplaying your weakness in information. In a world where information is increasingly the currency and pulse of the marketplace, skillful questioning clearly communicates your ability to efficiently gather this valuable commodity. When done with intelligence and integrity, inquiry clearly contributes to business success and personal fulfillment. Positive questioning is the most practical of wisdoms. It is the architecture of possibility.

Positive questions are not only a business issue; they are a matter of consciousness. The questioning attitude is an essential to a life well lived. If you feel personally poor, no matter what your wealth, I suggest it is because you have not used positive questions to enrich your mind and your soul. A life without questions deadens the brain and blunts the wit. Questions give you a way to capture ideas and create an organized approach to the challenges you face each day. As you reach into yourself

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