Hope or Hype: The Obsession with Medical Advances and the High Cost of False Promises

By Richard A. Deyo; Donald L. Patrick | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded the effort on this project through a Health Policy Research Investigator Award. We're extremely grateful for this opportunity. It has been a luxury rather than a burden to study and write about something that we find so interesting and important, but that is a bit of a departure from our daily work. David Mechanic and Lynn Rogut, in particular, were supportive and flexible in meeting our various requests. Alvin Tarlov gave us critical encouragement. The opinions and conclusions in this book are ours and not necessarily those of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

We had a lot of help in writing this book. Many of the ideas presented here have been the topic of discussions with our colleagues, whose indirect influence on this book has been important. These folks are too numerous to give them all credit, and we'd forget some anyway. To many of our friends and colleagues at the University of Washington, Columbia, Dartmouth, UCSF, Harvard, and elsewhere, thanks for your inspiration.

We were extremely fortunate to conduct interviews with several people at universities, state and federal agencies, professional societies, and the media. Special thanks to Gunnar Andersson, Len Cobb, Terry Corbin, Cathy DeAngelis, Todd Edwards, Jack Elinson, Dave Flum, Gary Franklin, Bob Gagne, Lee Glass, Rod Hayward, Roger Herdman, Joel Howell, James Kahn, Larry Kessler, Eileen Koski, Bruce Psaty, Scott Ramsey, Drummond Rennie, Sanjay Saint, Roger Sergel, Ken Shine, Hal Sox, Orhan Sulieman, Sean Tunis, Jim Weinstein, and Norm Weissman.

Another bunch of wonderful colleagues gave us critical feedback on things we wrote. They not only sharpened our thinking but extended it, added material, and improved our writing. These stalwarts included Michael Barry, Laurie Burke, Wylie Burke, Tim Carey, To m Koepsell, Mark Schoene, Greg Simon, Sean Sullivan, Gil Welch, Michael Wilkes,

-xv-

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