Hope or Hype: The Obsession with Medical Advances and the High Cost of False Promises

By Richard A. Deyo; Donald L. Patrick | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Richard A. Deyo, MD, MPH, is a Professor of Medicine and of Public Health at the University of Washington. As an academic general internist, he's involved with teaching, patient care, and research on new medical technology.

In 2004, he received the John M. Eisenberg Award for Career Achievement in Research from the Society of General Internal Medicine. Deyo is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He is also a member of the Society of General Internal Medicine (formerly on its national council), and of the American Public Health Association, and is listed in Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare.

Dr. Deyo has written more than 200 research publications and 50 invited editorials, review articles, and book chapters, and he recently co-edited a book entitled EvidenceBased Clinical Practice. In addition, he has lectured on special interests in medicine, and has been interviewed by ABC, CNN, and National Public Radio.

Best known for research on back pain, Deyo's interest in politics, profits, and the press arose when he was director of a research team on back surgery and member of a clinical guideline panel that came under attack from spine surgeons and implant manufacturers. Deyo described these events and their implications in the New England Journal of Medicine, the New York Times, New Yorker, and in an Australian television production entitled "Too Much Medicine."

Deyo is a graduate of Penn State School of Medicine and did his residency in internal medicine at the University of Texas in San Antonio.

Donald Patrick, PhD, MSPH, is Professor of Health Services in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of Washington. At UW, he directs the Social and Behavioral Sciences Program, the Seattle Quality of Life Group, and the Biobehavioral Cancer Training Program. He co-directs the End-of-Life Research Program.

His faculty career began at New York University and the University of California at San Diego, followed by appointments at Yale and St. Thomas's Medical School in London. He then returned to the U.S. to teach at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill0, before moving to Seattle.

Patrick is a member of the Institute of Medicine, is inaugural president of the International Society for Quality of Life Research, and is a member of the American Sociological Association and the American Public Health Association, where he helped to found the Special Interest Group on Disability. He has been elected fellow of the Academy for Health Services Research and Policy.

Patrick has extensive experience with population health status assessment and outcomes research, and has applied his interests to working with vulnerable populations. His dissertation on measuring social preferences for health outcomes remains a classic in the field. In a previous book, Health Status and Health Policy, Patrick described the links between quality of life, cost-effectiveness, and health policy.

Also an expert in pharmacoeconomic outcomes research and its uses in regulatory approval and marketing, Patrick has authored more than 200 scientific articles, dozens of book chapters, and is editor of five books. He is frequently invited to speak on health policy, regulatory affairs, and disablement in the U.S. and Europe.

Dr. Patrick graduated from Northwestern University, and holds master's and doctoral degree from Columbia University.

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