Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting and Orienting New Employees

By Diane Arthur | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Additional Types of
Questions

A former student of mine recently sent me an e-mail. He had completed one of my courses on interviewing skills about three months before and was pleased to report that he was able to apply much of what he'd learned. He commented that, at the time, he'd thought I was making too big a deal about the importance of asking different types of questions; that, initially, he'd seen nothing wrong with simply asking, “Tell me about yourself.” I wrote back that I was delighted he'd found the class useful and asked him, “What's the most important thing you learned about asking questions during an employment interview?” His response came back immediately: “I learned that any thought can be expressed in a number of different ways. The wording you choose will determine how much information you receive and how useful that information is in making a hiring decision.”

I knew he was copying that statement from his notes, but I didn't care. His response demonstrated an understanding of the power of words during an interview, and how extensively the wording of a question impacts the end result. I was also thrilled that he no longer used the “Tell me about yourself” question, which I consider to be among the worst ever asked: It lacks direction and structure, and invites applicants to volunteer illegal information.

I wrote back, “Good for you, your organization, and all the applicants you interview! Can you impress me further by telling me the types of questions you ask?” I received his answer within minutes: “In addition to posing competency-based questions during most of the interview, I present open-ended, hypothetical, probing, and some close-ended questions. And even though you didn't ask, I'll tell you what questioning techniques I avoid: trait, multiple choice, and forced choice, because these types of questions usually result in meaningless or misleading information.”

Once again, I recognized my own words; and as before, it didn't matter. He'd walked into my class believing that the wording of questions was irrelevant, but he left appreciating the role well-worded questions play in the selection process. I was pleased.


Open-Ended Questions

By definition, open-ended questions require full, multiple-word responses. The answers generally lend themselves to discussion and result in information upon which

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting and Orienting New Employees
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.