How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills

By Nan Levinson | Go to book overview

1
Writng for
Your Reader

Learning Objectives
By the end of this chapter, you should be able to:
Name three major categories of criteria for good business writing.
Ask the central question you need to answer before you begin writing.
List the three levels of potential readers within an organization.
Name three ways of applying basic psychology to encourage readers to read your message.
List five elements that contribute to an appropriate tone in most business writing.

Some people like to write. They feel creative and energized when faced with a blank computer screen or fresh sheet of paper. They put their thoughts down easily and need to do only a minimum of rewriting and reorganizing. Then there's everybody else. This second group—by far the larger—stares into space, sharpens every pencil within a five-mile radius, writes a sentence and then crosses it out, gets a cup of coffee, tries another sentence, rejects it, and finally picks up the phone and attempts to take care of business without having to write at all.

The problem with this solution is that not all business can be transacted by phone or in person. Even with the advances in communication technology over the past two decades, the ability to express oneself in writing remains an essential part of doing business. Fortunately, there are practical, concrete ways to sharpen your writing skills so that you can join the ranks of proficient writers. That's the point of this course: to learn to use the written word for

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How to Sharpen Your Business Writing Skills
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About This Course xi
  • How to Take This Course xiii
  • Pre-Test xv
  • 1: Writng for Your Reader 1
  • 2: Getting Organized 19
  • 3: Types of Business Writing 39
  • 4: Effective Writing 57
  • 5: The Right Word: Appropriate Language 75
  • 6: Language That Works 91
  • 7: Direct and Forceful Writing 105
  • 8: Write and Rewrite: Punctuating and Revising 121
  • 9: Research: Fact-Finding Missions 137
  • 10: Plugging In: Computers and Business Communication 155
  • Bibliography 169
  • Post-Test 171
  • Index 177
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