The Dark Side of Liberalism: Elitism vs. Democracy

By Robert Hollinger | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many colleagues and friends have been of enormous help. David Depew invited me to participate in a conference on Philosophy and American Culture at California State University at Fullerton in March 1990. The result was an earlier version of chapter 5. Joe Margolis and Depew urged me to turn my paper on Rorty into a book, and made extremely helpful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript, as did Dick Bernstein and Tom McCarthy. My colleagues Tony Smith, Bill Robinson, and Dik Van Iten were of great help. Tony and Bill read and commented extensively on an early version of this book. Dik allowed me a semester without teaching responsibilities so that I could begin to write. I am grateful to them all. The late Konnie Kolenda made very helpful criticisms of my Fullerton paper on Rorty, and on my manuscript. He will be missed.

My colleague in the history department at Iowa State University, Alan I. Marcus, gave me the opportunity to lecture at an NEH Summer Institute he directed in Ames in 1990 and 1994 on the history of technology and science in America. He has taught me a great deal about American history and afforded me the opportunity to explore a wide variety of historical material. Much of this book could never have been written without this opportunity. I am also thankful to the National Endowment for the Humanities. I would like to thank Sheryl Kamps, Department of English, Iowa State University, for preparing the manuscript for publication and Karen Comstock for editing the final version of the manuscript.

My wife, Pat, and our daughter, Lisa, have, as always, been my haven in the world. The support I have received over the years from my late mother, Ruth Hollinger, and my parents-in-law, Virginia and Henry Pinkert, can never be adequately acknowledged.

-ix-

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