Storytelling: Art and Technique

By Ellin Greene | Go to book overview

Foreword

I FIRST MET ELLIN GREENE when she was a student at the Rutgers Graduate School of Library Service. I had gone to the university to talk with the students about storytelling and to tell stories. From her attentive listening, I sensed Ellin's love of storytelling. Upon graduation from library school she was offered a position at the New York Public Library, but chose to stay at the Elizabeth (N.J.) Public Library where a new position as group work specialist had been created for her.

Ellin later took a course in storytelling that I was teaching at the New School for Social Research. She began telling stories from her English heritage background—tales collected by the folklorist Joseph Jacobs and the literary fairy tales of Eleanor Farjeon and Walter de la Mare. Eventually, she would go to England to do research for her doctorate on the relationship between Farjeon's imaginative play in childhood and her fairy tales for children.

Ellin became my assistant at the New York Public Library in September 1959. My work as supervisor of storytelling had been expanded and I needed an assistant. Sometime later, after I became coordinator of children's work and Ellin had worked as children's specialist in the Bronx Borough for a year, she became the assistant coordinator and storytelling and group work specialist. In that position she was responsible for the library's storytelling program in the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island. She assisted experienced storytellers with program planning and shared story hours, trained new staff members in storytelling and picture-book reading, and from the new staff chose the tellers and planned the annual Storytelling Symposium held at the New York Public Library each May in honor of Marie Shedlock. During the summer months, she told stories at the Hans Christian Andersen statue in Central Park and at numerous other parks and playgrounds throughout the city.

In 1968 Ellin left the New York Public Library to teach at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and to earn a doctorate in creative arts education. She went on to join the faculty of the University of Chicago Graduate Library School where she taught courses in storytelling, library services to children, and early childhood materials and services. Her inter-

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Storytelling: Art and Technique
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • 1: Storytelling: a Historical Perspective 1
  • 2: Storytelling to Children in Libraries 8
  • 3: Purpose and Values of Storytelling 33
  • 4: Selection 48
  • 5: Preparation 63
  • 6: Presentation 81
  • 7: Storytelling to Children with Special Needs or in Special Settings 96
  • 8: Storytelling to Young Children 114
  • 9: Storytelling to Young Adults 138
  • 10: Children and Young Adults as Storytellers 149
  • 11: Program Planning 161
  • 12: Administration of the Story-Hour Program and In-Service Education 169
  • Festschrift for Augusta Baker 186
  • Appendix - Sources for the Storyteller 257
  • Glossary 319
  • Index 323
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