Racial Issues in Criminal Justice: The Case of African Americans

By Marvin D. Free Jr. | Go to book overview

About the Editor and
Contributors

DAVID V. BAKER has a Ph.D. from the University of CaliforniaRiverside and a J.D. from California Southern Law School. He is an associate professor of sociology in the Behavioral Sciences Department at Riverside Community College. He has contributed works to several professional journals, including Ethnic Studies, Social Justice, The Justice Professional, Social Science Journal, Women and Criminal Justice, and Criminal Justice Abstracts. A coauthor of numerous books, Dr. Baker has received two National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships and is an associate editor for The Justice Professiotial.

PAUL J. BECKER is an assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work at the University of Dayton, where he also is affiliated with the Criminal Justice Studies Program. Research interests include white racial extremist groups, hate crimes, state and corporate crime, and the Internet. Previous research has appeared in the International Revieiv of Law, Computers, and Technology, The Justice Professional, Teaching Sociology, and the American Journal of Criminal Justice.

BRYAN D. BYERS holds a doctorate from the University of Notre Dame and is currently an associate professor of criminal justice and criminology at Ball State University. Dr. Byers' field experiences include positions as a prosecutor's special investigator, adult protective services investigator, deputy coroner, mental health liaison, juvenile corrections worker, criminal justice trainer, and researcher. He has published over twenty-five articles and book chapters and has written or edited five books.

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