The Invention of Politics in the European Avant-Garde (1906-1940)

By Sascha Bru; Gunther Martens | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Mapping an invention, like the act of inventing itself, does not happen overnight. It takes time to get acquainted with a field of expertise first in order to stumble upon the obvious. In this process a lot of friends and colleagues were involved. The idea for this book first arose in 2003, when at a Modernist Studies Association conference in Birmingham we organised a panel on the role of politics, performativity and performance in the modernist avant-garde. Our gratitude goes out to the people present in the panel's audience for their enthusiastic responses to the idea of a volume coming out of the panel. We would also like to thank Karlheinz (Carlo) Barck, whom we had invited to contribute to the panel, for his relentless support and critical input ever since 2003. In various ways, we owe a debt to many for the larger conceptions of politics discussed here. Special thanks, however, go to Koenraad Geldof. Our debt further goes to Klaus Beekman. His ongoing encouragement and confidence in this book proved vital to us. In the case of the introduction, special thanks go to Tania Ørum, Astradur Eysteinsson and various others present at a conference in Iceland, where a first draft was read and commented upon. We would further like to thank all those who held positions differing from ours. Without them this volume simply would not have been compiled. A note on translations is due. Use was made primarily of existing translations and transliterations. Where these were not available contributors provided their own. We should like to thank them for their efforts in this respect. Last but not least, we wish to extend our gratitude to Eva Pszeniczko and Goedele Nuyttens for helping us out in the final phase.

S.B. & G.M.

-7-

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